The following proposals passed:


Proposal 22: add 100km to section 4D.15.1 Distance Measurement for Traditional distances

Committee: Road

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 09, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

16 out of 18 voting members have voted.

Agree: 15, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

As 100km is approved as a road racing world record distance, it is essential that we add it to section 4D.15.1 Distance Measurement for Traditional distances. Currently it is listed in section 4D.15.2 as a non-traditional race distance where the course must be measured with an accuracy of plus or minus 3%. This is not enough accurate.

 

Proposal

Old rule:

4D.15 Race Distances and Distance Measurement

4D.15.1 Distance Measurement for Traditional Distances

In the case where a traditional race distance is used (such as 10k or Marathon – 42.195k), the course must be accurately measured along the shortest possible path. The course must be guaranteed to be no shorter than the advertised distance.

 

New Rule

 

4D.15 Race Distances and Distance Measurement

4D.15.1 Distance Measurement for Traditional Distances

In the case where a traditional race distance is used (such as 10k or Marathon – 42.195k, or 100k), the course must be accurately measured along the shortest possible path. The course must be guaranteed to be no shorter than the advertised distance.

 

Body

The proposal is based on discussion #58.

The rule does not require hosts to offer 100k at an event, however, if it is offered it must be measured accurately.

 

References


Proposal 11: 14B.6.4 Face-off - Height of drop, player positioning, whistle to start play

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 18, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Cover off

height of ball drop

distance of players

referee whistle to start play

Proposal

Old

14B.6.4 Face-off

To resume the game without penalizing one of the teams, a face-off can be used. For the face-off, the Referee drops the ball between two opposing players. Play starts when the ball touches the ground. A face-off during the game is executed where the ball was when the game was interrupted. Exception: Within the goal area, the face-off is executed at the closest corner mark. 

 

 

New

14B.6.4 Face-off

To resume the game without penalizing one of the teams, a face-off can be used. For the face-off, the Referee drops the ball between two opposing players. The ball should be dropped from below hip height of players in the vicinity. One player from each team may take part in the face-off with all other players’ unicycles and sticks at a distance of at least 2.0m from the ball. Play starts when the ball touches the ground as signalled by the referees whistle. A face-off during the game is executed where the ball was when the game was interrupted. Exception: Within the goal area, the face-off is executed at the closest corner mark. 

Body

This rule change puts more strict guidelines for height of ball drop, where other players may be placed in relation to the face-off and stipulates that the referee MUST blow the whistle as the ball hits the ground.

References


Proposal 13: Points for Pedal Grabs in Finals

Committee: Trials

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 19, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 8, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

Reward Cleaner Riding in Finals.

Proposal

Old

12B.5.3 Scoring Points

The course is divided in different sections of easy, medium and hard lines. Easy lines are worth one point, medium lines are worth three points and hard lines are worth seven points. The objective is to score as many points as possible by successfully riding (“cleaning”) sections within the specified time period.

Difficulty Points Easy 1 point Medium 3 points Hard 7 points

 

New

12B.5.3 Scoring Points

The preliminary course is divided in different sections of easy, medium and hard lines. Easy lines are worth one point, medium lines are worth three points and hard lines are worth seven points. The objective is to score as many points as possible by successfully riding (“cleaning”) sections within the specified time period.

 

Preliminary Round

Difficulty              Points

Easy                    1 point

Medium               3 points

Hard                    7 points

 

During finals, completion of a line with zero pedal grabs will be worth three points. A deduction of 0.5 points will be made for each pedal/crank grab used during completion of the line, with a maximum of two points deducted i.e. 4 pedal grabs.

Final Round

Base Points for Line Completion                                                     3 points

Number of Pedal Grabs Used for Line Completion                        Total Points Received for Line        

1                                                                                                       2.5 points

2                                                                                                       2 points

3                                                                                                       1.5 points

=>4                                                                                                  1 points

A pedal/crank grab is defined as the rider placing their weight on an obstacle through the bottom of the pedal/crank which is in contact with the obstacle (see 12B.5.4 Definition Of “Cleaning”).

A pedal/crank grab is considered complete after a clear takeoff by pushing through the pedal/crank and not though the tyre.

The pedal/crank may be re-positioned during a pedal/crank grab without being considered a new grab as long as the pedal does not move more than the width of the pedal away from the initial position on the obstacle. i.e. traversing an object in continuous half pedal width grabs will result in multiple pedal/crank grabs recorded.

 

Old

12B.5.5 Multiple Attempts

Riders may attempt any problem multiple times until they succeed or decide to abandon the section. However, it is not possible to earn additional points by cleaning a section more than once, and no points are awarded if the rider does not clean the entire section.

New

12B.5.5 Multiple Attempts

Riders may attempt any problem multiple times until they succeed or decide to abandon the section. During preliminary rounds, it is not possible to earn additional points by cleaning a section more than once, and no points are awarded if the rider does not clean the entire section. During finals a rider may re-complete a line with fewer pedal grabs to receive a higher score. Only the rider’s best result at each line will be recorded.

Body

Provide more points for less pedal grabs. Addressed (hopefully) all instances where rules need to be changed to make this work.

References


Proposal 12: 14B.5 Number Of Players - Clarification of how to substitute players.

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 20, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Give strict guidelines on how to substitute players

Proposal

 

Old

14B.5 Number Of Players

A team consists of five players (plus substitutes). Substituting one player for another is possible at any time. It is not necessary to indicate it to the Referee. The new player must enter the field where the other has left it. Each player can be the goalkeeper at any time. The goalkeeper has no special rights. To take part in a game, a team must have at least three players.

 

New

14 B.5 Number Of Players

 

A team on the field consists of up to five players with a team requiring a minimum of three players to begin a match. Player substitutions are possible at any time with the substituting player entering the field at the same location only after the other has completely left it. It is not necessary to indicate substitutions to the Referee. Each player can be the goalkeeper at any time. The goalkeeper has no special rights.

 

 

Body

This gives clear guidelines on how to substitute.

 

If a team is playing with less than 5 (not due to having a person sent off) they don't have to wait for the player to completely leave the field as it technically is not a "substitution"

 

If a team is playing with less than 5 due to someone being sent off they DO have to wait for the player to completely leave the field before substituting.

I believe these examples do not need to be given as this is obvious?

References


Proposal 1: Platform long jump - single pallet to single pallet.

Committee: Jumps

Vote Summary:

Passed on November 01, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 13 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Long jump to platform currently enables rolling hops similar to regular long jump. 

This proposal is to limit rolling hops so techniques can only be static side hops and very small pre-hop side hops.

Proposal

Old Wording

13B.10 Event Flow: Long Jump on Platform In the Long Jump on Platform competition, the rider attempts to jump as far as possible from a short pallet run-up to a landing pad without a dismount. Following the jump, the rider must then stay mounted and in control on the unicycle for 3 seconds on the landing pallets (described in setup below).

Riders may jump with the wheel going forward or sideways. The rider may break off the attempt as long as they are still on the pallet run-up. As soon as they jump in any direction from the pallet run-up, it counts as an attempt. The farthest non-fouling, successful jump is recorded.

The rider must start on the run-up and land on the landing platform without touching the ground. After landing, the rider must remain mounted and on the landing platform for 3 seconds, as counted by a judge. The rider may do any form of idling, hopping or stillstanding during the 3 seconds. Once the judge has counted 3 seconds, the jump is complete. To avoid endless competitions, the length to jump will always increase by 5cm for each round. Once there are only 5 riders left, the final starts and it’s up to the riders to decide in which steps they continue. 

13D.7 Setup: Long Jump on Platform The riding area consists of a run-up platform and landing platform of the same height and width. 

Both platforms should be a fixed together so that they do not move when jumped from or landed on. It is recommended to cover the pallets with plywood or a similar material of sufficient friction to allow for safe landings. If EUR pallets are used, a minimum of 24 EUR pallets would be needed (with spares recommended). A Long Jump on Platform competition needs a minimum area of 12x2 meters. Run-up platform: If EUR pallets are used, the platform must be three pallets high by five pallets long, requiring 15 pallets. The pallets should be placed the “wide” way such that the dimensions of the run-up platform are 43.5cm H x 4m L x 1.2m W. If EUR pallets are not used the run-up platform must be between 3.5 and 4.5 meters long, 1 to 1.5 meters wide and 40 to 45 cm high. Landing platform: If EUR pallets are used, the platform must be three pallets high by three pallets long, requiring 9 pallets. The pallets should be placed the “wide” way such that the dimensions of the take-off platform are 43.5cm H x 2.4m L x 1.2m W. If EUR pallets are not used the take-off platform must be between 2 and 3 meters long, 1 to 1.5 meters wide and 40 to 45 cm high.

 

New Wording:

13B.10 Event Flow: Long Jump on Platform

In the Long Jump on Platform competition, the rider attempts to jump as far as possible from a take-off platform to a landing platform without a dismount. The rider must remain mounted and in control on the unicycle for 3 seconds on the landing platform (described in setup below).

Riders may jump with the wheel facing forward or sideways. The rider may break off the attempt as long as they are still on the take-off platform. As soon as they jump in any direction (landing anywhere but the take-off platform), it counts as an attempt. The farthest non-fouling, successful jump is recorded.

The rider must begin stationary on the take-off platform [other option: the rider must mount on the take off platform] and must land on the landing platform without touching the ground. The rider must land with their wheel on top of the landing surface i.e. they may not pedal grab then go to tyre. After landing, the rider must remain mounted and on the landing platform for 3 seconds, as counted by a judge. The rider may do any form of idling, hopping or stillstanding during the 3 seconds. Once the judge has counted 3 seconds, the jump is complete. The length of jump will increase by 5cm increments for each round until 5 riders remain in the competition. When 5 riders remain the riders may decide on smaller increments when increasing the distance. 

 

13D.7 Setup: Long Jump on Platform The jump area consists of a takeoff platform and landing platform of the same height, width and length. 

Both platforms should be fixed together to prevent movement throughout the eventEUR pallets (120cm x 80cm x 14.5cm) are recommended and should be covered with plywood or a similar material of sufficient friction to allow for safe landings. If EUR pallets are used the event requires 6 pallets however spares are recommended.

Take-off and landing platform: The dimension of the takeoff and landing surface should be 120cm x 80cm (EUR pallet) with the platforms orientated parallel along the 120cm side to ensure that riders are jumping from or landing onto the 120cm side. The platforms must be equal height between 36cm and 45cm (3 pallets) high. If EUR pallets are not available the platform should be marked to ensure the surface dimensions that may be used is no larger than 120cm x 80cm.

 

Body

I have changed most mentions of the "pallets" to the "platform" as it is possible that someone could build a platform without pallets.

I have outlined dimensions of 120cm x 80cm and suggested EUR Pallets based on these dimensions. I have noted that if pallets are longer than 80cm then the surface should be marked to make sure that only 80cm width of the pallet may be used for takeoff and landing. 

I have outlined that the rider must be stationary on the take-off platform. Another option is to say that the rider "must mount on the take off platform"

Added that they cannot pedal grab then go to tyre.

References


Proposal 32: Update 4B.3 Rider Identification

Committee: Road

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 20, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

16 out of 18 voting members have voted.

Agree: 15, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 1.

Background

This proposal give the hosts an option to require an unmodified bib on front and back of riders during road races. This will help the manual data recording that is often essential to small events and as backup to large events.

Proposal

Current Rule

4B.3 Rider Identification

Riders must wear their race number clearly visible on their chest so that it is visible during the race and as the rider crosses the finish line. Additionally, the rider may be required to wear a chip for electronic timing.

New Rule
4B.3 Rider Identification
Riders must wear their race number(s) fixed at the four corners, clearly visible on their chest and, when required, on their back so that it is visible during the race and as the rider crosses the finish line. Riders must use the officially provided race number unmodified in any manner. Numbers should not be folded, trimmed, or otherwise defaced. Referee approval must be sought to modify a number plate if it cannot otherwise be attached securely due to hydration pack, rider physique or posture when riding. Lost or damaged race numbers must be replaced with approval by referee. Additionally, riders may be required to wear a chip for electronic timing.

Body

See Discussion.

 

 

References


Proposal 10: Safety Requirements

Committee: Trials

Vote Summary:

Passed on November 26, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 1.

Background

Shin guards are not necessary should be optional. Unlikely to help a catastrophic injury, mainly for comfort.

Proposal

12B.1 Safety

All riders must wear a helmet, shin guards, and shoes as defined in chapter 1D.1. Gloves and knee protection are recommended.

 

New

12B.1 Safety All riders must wear a helmet and shoes as defined in chapter 1D.1. Gloves, shin guards and knee protection are recommended.

Body

Shin guards are not necessary should be optional. Unlikely to help a catastrophic injury, mainly for comfort.

References


Proposal 31: 9C.5 Removing Scores

Committee: X-Style

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 20, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

13 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 13, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

I hope this rule doesn't have to be used but i would wish that there's a rule that allows the chief judge to cross out a judges ranking if it's completly out of place after talking to that judge and letting him explain his ranking.

Cause of the different styles the ranking will always differ quite a lot so it's a big resposibility to give to the chief judge. This rule is only meant for extreme cases that hopefully won't happen.

Proposal

Old

9C.4 Judging

…(long section)...

Negative aspects like dismounts are ignored. Every judge should use blank sheets of paper to take notes.

 

The highest and the lowest placing points per rider are discarded. All the remaining placing points get summed up for each rider. The 3 riders with the fewest points win and advance to the next round.

 

 

New:


9C.4 Judging

…(long section)...

Negative aspects like dismounts are ignored. Every judge should use blank sheets of paper to take notes.

 

9C.5 Removing Scores

The highest and the lowest placing points per rider are discarded. All the remaining placing points get summed up for each rider. The 3 riders with the fewest points win and advance to the next round.

 

Additionally, the Chief Judge has the power to remove scores only if they are deemed to be biased, inaccurate, or another extreme case.

Body

This rule gives the Chief Judge the power to remove scores in extreme cases. It also reorganizes the other removing of scores information.

References


Proposal 15: 14B.10.4 High Stick

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on February 07, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

8 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 8, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

People agree that the stick can only be raised when defending a shot on goal not at any point when in the vicinity of goal.

At this point including this text will increase the safety of the game compared to without it.

Proposal

Old Rule

14B.10.4 High Stick

The blade of the stick must always be below the players’ own hips and the hips of all players in the vicinity who might be endangered. Exception: In direct vicinity of one’s own goal, the lower end of the stick can be raised as high as the crossbar of the goal.

 

 

New Rule

14B.10.4 High Stick

The blade of the stick must always be below the players’ own hips and the hips of all players in the vicinity who might be endangered. Exception: When defending a shot on goal in the direct vicinity of one’s own goal , the lower end of the stick can be raised as high as the crossbar of the goal.

Body

Included the text. "when defending a shot on goal"

References


Proposal 14: 14B.6.1 Free Shot - Delay of game penalty exception

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on February 07, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

8 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 7, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 1.

Background

I believe this exception needs to go under free shot not under penalties as it describes an exception to the placing of the ball for a penalty.

Proposal

 

Old Rule

 

14B.6.1 Free Shot

The free shot is the standard penalty for all violations of the rules. It is applied in all cases except for those explicitly mentioned in sections 14B.6.2-14B.6.4. The free shot is executed from the point where the violation was done. Exceptions: If a team gets a free shot within the opponents’ goal area, the free shot is executed at the closest corner mark (corner shot). If a team gets a free shot within their own goal area, the free shot is done at a distance of 1m in front of the goal line (goalkeeper’s ball). 

The free shot is indirect. The player executing the free shot may only touch the ball once until a contact by another player occurs. The ball shall be hit with the stick, not dragged, flicked or lifted on the stick. Opposing players must keep a distance with their unicycles and their sticks of at least 2.0m from the ball.

 

New Rule

 

14B.6.1 Free Shot

The free shot is the standard penalty for all violations of the rules. It is applied in all cases except for those explicitly mentioned in sections 14B.6.2-14B.6.4. The free shot is executed from the point where the violation was done. Exceptions: If a team receives a free shot within the opponents’ goal area, the free shot is executed at the closest corner mark (corner shot). If a team receives a free shot within their own goal area, the free shot is taken at a distance of 1m in front of the goal line (goalkeeper’s ball). In the instance that a delay of game penalty is given, the penalty will be taken from the center mark.

 The free shot is indirect. The player executing the free shot may only touch the ball once until a contact by another player occurs. The ball shall be hit with the stick, not dragged, flicked or lifted on the stick. Opposing players must keep a distance with their unicycles and their sticks of at least 2.0m from the ball.

 

 

Body

I think this English is better. I think it should be placed under free shot not penalties..

References


Proposal 39: Definition of "in control" moment for finishing a road race

Committee: Road

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 29, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

15 out of 18 voting members have voted.

Agree: 15, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Since the 2017 Rulebook, the definition for being "in control" has been changed for track races. It has not been changed for road races. Therefore, we now have a discrepancy which I think is unwanted.

The finish moment for both track and road races is when the front of the tyre crosses the finish. The outcome of the race should not depend of what happens after the finish. This proposal fixes that.

Proposal

OLD RULE:

4B.5.8 Finishes

Finish times are determined when the front of the tire first crosses the vertical plane of the nearest edge of the finish line.

Riders are always timed by their wheels, not by outstretched bodies. If riders do not cross the line in control, they are awarded a 5 second penalty to their time. “Control” is defined by the rearmost part of the wheel crossing completely over the vertical finish plane (as defined above) with the rider having both feet on the pedals. (Note: a rider is not considered in control if the unicycle crosses the finish line independent of the rider. The finish time is still measured by when the wheel crosses the vertical finish plane and the 5 second penalty is applied.)

In the case where a rider is finishing with a broken unicycle, the rider must bring at minimum the wheel to the finish line, and time is still taken when the wheel crosses the finish line. The 5 second penalty is applied.

NEW RULE:

4B.5.8 Finishes

Finish times are determined when the front of the tire first crosses the vertical plane of the nearest edge of the finish line.

Riders are always timed by their wheels, not by outstretched bodies. If riders do not cross the line in control, they are awarded a 5 second penalty to their time. “Control” is defined by the front of the wheel crossing the vertical finish plane (as defined above) with the rider having both feet on the pedals. (Note: a rider is not considered in control if the unicycle crosses the finish line independent of the rider. The finish time is still measured by when the wheel crosses the vertical finish plane and the 5 second penalty is applied.)

In the case where a rider is finishing with a broken unicycle, the rider must bring at minimum the wheel to the finish line, and time is still taken when the wheel crosses the finish line. The 5 second penalty is applied.

Body

The essential change is from "rearmost part" to "front".
As per my text suggestion in the discussion, I also deleted "completely over" as I think it is redundant.

References


Proposal 18: New Flatland Scoring

Committee: Flatland

Vote Summary:

Passed on April 14, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

11 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 11, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

100% of people who voted agreed with this proposal however we didn't have enough people vote on this most likely because of not checking their email. (only 5 votes)

It would be nice to know that this didn't pass because people didn't like it not because they just didn't vote.

If we put this through again I will make an effort to go and hit up all the members individually to at least get them to vote. I believe this should go through again and be given proper attention.

 

 

 

It seems that we need to attribute a little more points to difficulty in flatland. While I do not disagree with this, making judging easy for judges is also really important


It becomes even easier to score because everything is /10. Difficulty is worth more, which I think makes most happy, consistency and variety a wroth a tad less and flow and last trick stay relatively the same. 

Proposal

////////// OLD \\\\\\\\\\

 

DIFFICULTY (0 to 10 points): Score is given for technical difficulty of the tricks and combos landed during the battle/preliminary.

CONSISTENCY (0 to 10 points): Score is given for number of landed trick/combos on total of number of tricks/combos attempted during the battle/preliminary.

VARIETY (0 to 10 points): Score is given for variation in the types of tricks done during the battle/preliminary.

FLOW (0 to 5 points): Score is given for cleanliness and style of rider during the battle/preliminary.

LAST TRICK (0 to 5 points): Score is given for technical difficulty, novelty, creativity, and flow. The rider is not obligated to use all attempts or to try the same trick every attempt. Only the last attempt will be scored. Other failed attempts do not subtract from the score.

TOTAL (0 to 40 points)

 

///
//////
////////
////////// NEW \\\\\\\\\\
//////
////
////

DIFFICULTY worth 25% of total score. Judges score /10 (score * 2.5 = weighed score)

CONSISTENCY worth 23% of total score. Judges score /10 (score * 2.3 = weighed score)

FLOW worth 20% of total score. Judges score /10 (score * 2 = weighed score)

VARIETY worth 18% of total score. Judges score /10 (score * 1.8 = weighed score)

 

LAST TRICK worth 14% of total score. Judges score /10 (score * 1.4 = weighed score)

 

Body

We used this at Winter EUC'19. Judges were amazed by how much easier judging became with everything on 10. The results seemed to reflect what should have happened with the results.

It also reflects more what seems right on who should win a battle after a battle. It also takes no time to score battles if needed, if using a computer.

You can see how it looks in an excel sheet

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ShsZqvrO2rdEUlLM8u6dRL2PNInR9gUPD7aYShR4qSA/edit?usp=sharing

References


Proposal 16: Penalty shootout - backwards movement of ball

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on February 22, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

7 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 6, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

Large consensus to look at this rule seriously. 

Proposal

OLD RULE

 

14B.7.2 Penalty Shootout

The goalkeeper must be close to the goal line, at least until the attacking player has had contact with the ball. The Referee places the ball on the center point and the player taking the shot will, after the whistle of the Referee, play the ball from there, trying to score a goal. The ball must be kept in motion towards the goal line (no backwards movement allowed) and once it is shot, the play shall be considered complete. No goal can be scored on a rebound of any kind (an exception being the ball off the goal post and/or the goalkeeper and then directly into the goal), and any time the ball crosses the goal line, the shot shall be  considered complete.

 

NEW RULE

14B.7.2 Penalty Shootout

The goalkeeper must be close to the goal line, at least until the attacking player has had contact with the ball. The Referee places the ball on the center point and the player taking the shot will, after the whistle of the Referee, play the ball from there, trying to score a goal. The player must remain in motion towards the goal line with no backwards movement or stopping allowed. Once the ball has been shot, the play shall be considered complete. No goal can be scored on a rebound of any kind (an exception being the ball off the goal post and/or the goalkeeper and then directly into the goal), and any time the ball crosses the goal line, the shot shall be considered complete.

 

 

Body

Pros: Allows a full range of stick work when completing penalty shootout including forward backwards stickhandling, toe drags, behind the back passes etc. Rewards players who try and better their skills by allowing them to use these skills to win a game, instead of handicapping them for the players who choose not to practice. Enables more interesting goals with higher skills shown which is a beneficial for live spectators, advertising our sport (social media etc) and enticing people to take up the sport as it looks cool. 

Cons: People who don't train or want to improve their stick handling will have less of a handicap than they used to against a better player. It has been argued it would be more dangerous but I don't see why this would occur.

 

Changes to gameplay/refereeing/tournaments: A penalty shootout may involve more exciting goals than it has previously as there will be broader range of movements to utilise. By requiring the player to always be moving forward instead of the ball it will take a similar amount of time for a penalty shot to be completed. Previously you would need the ball to move forward very slowly if you wanted to slow down the penalty shot, now you would need yourself to move forward very slowly, unlikely to see a change here particularly as the slowing down of penalty shots has never really been an issue. Refereeing should be unchanged or slightly improved. Whether someone has stopped/ridden away from the goal line is potentially easier to assess than whether the ball has moved away from the goal line when someone is doing fast side to side stickwork parallel to the goal line. Potentially greater percentage of goals scored in penalty shootouts however both teams will have the same conditions.

 

Note: Implementing this rule change to start with as it has been pointed out that it would likely be easier to referee than floorball rules where the ball OR the player must be moving forward. If the rule is positive then at a future time we may discuss the floorball rule if we think it is necessary to improve ruling/gameplay.

 

References


Proposal 52: 800m - definition of the point from which the non-lane racing rules are applied (changing 2B.6.3)

Committee: Track

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 02, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

The current rule 2B.6.3 does not contain a clear and unambiguous definition of the point at which riders are allowed to leave the lane and the non-lane racing rules are applied at an 800m race where the start is performed in individual lanes.

Proposal

Old Rule:

 

2B.6.3 800m Race

In the 800m race, riders start in a lane, but at some point (usually the first turn) non-lane racing rules apply. Dismounts are allowed.

 

New Rule:

 

 

2B.6.3 800m Race

Riders are started in separate lanes, at separate locations. The race shall be run in lanes as far as the nearer edge of the breakline where riders may leave their respective lanes. The breakline shall be an arced line marked after the first bend across all lanes other than lane 1. To assist athletes identify the breakline, halved tennis balls can be placed on the lane lines immediately before the intersection of the lines and the breakline. After the breakline, non-lane racing rules apply. Dismounts are allowed.

Body

This proposal is only for defining the breakline more precisely - if the vote for the second proposal (Proposal 51: 800m & 400m - moving the start variants from 2B.6.9 to 2B.6.2 & 2B.6.3) is positive, this sentence will be inserted at the appropriate position in the description of a staggered start.

For more information and the the improvement of the proposal please look and comment into discussion#80: "800m - definition of the point from which the non-lane racing rules are applied (changing 2B.6.3)".

For more information and the the improvement of the other proposal about moving the start variants please look and comment into discussion#83: "800m - moving the start variants from 2B.6.9 to 2B.6.3".

References


Proposal 7: Ammend Time stoppage Rules

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 03, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

A number of small changes around time stoppages need to be altered.

14C.2.7 Referee Hand Signs has some examples of when time should be stopped but I don't think they are that thorough. I have put in new ones which seem more likely.

Proposal

OLD

14B.8.1 General Considerations

All players must take care not to endanger others. The game is non-contact: the opponents and their unicycles may not be touched. The players must take care not to hit an opponent with their stick, especially after a shot. Only in the vicinity of the ball may a player touch an opponent’s stick with their stick to block them. However, this contact may not be hard. It is illegal to turn the blade of the stick upside down in order to hook into an opponent’s stick. Raising the opponent’s stick is allowed in principle, if not done using exaggerated roughness. If the opponent’s stick is raised to a high stick (see section 14B.10.4), it is always considered exaggerated roughness. Intentional delay of the game is not permitted. 

 

New

14B.8.1 General Considerations

..Intentional delay of the game is not permitted and may result in a penalty and the stoppage of time.

 

OLD

14B.7.1 Game Duration

The play time is given by the playing schedule and is a relative play time. The time only stops if the Referee requests a time out. The teams change sides during the break. At the start of each period, all players must be in their own half of the field. Each period starts with a face-off at the center mark. If the game ends in a draw and a decision is necessary, play is continued with extended time. If it’s still a draw, a decision is reached with a penalty shootout.

New

14B.7.1 Game Duration

..The time stops only at the request of the Referee.

 

OLD

14C.2.7 Referee Hand Signs

Time out” Form the letter “T” with both hands. The game is interrupted for example if a player is injured or if the spectators disturb the game.

 

New

14C.2.7 Referee Hand Signs

“Stop Timer” Form the letter “T” with both hands. The stoppage of time is deemed necessary by a referee for example if a player is injured, intentional delay of game occurs or discussion between referees or between referee and players is needed.

 

OLD

14C.2.4 The Timer

The Timer checks the time of play with a stopwatch and/or with a score board. The time is started whenever the Referee starts the game by blowing the whistle. Each period is ended by the sound of the score board (e.g. horn, bell, gong) or the blowing of a whistle by the timer. The Timer also stops the time whenever the Referee requests a time out. 

New

14C.2.4 The Timer

..The Timer also stops the time whenever the Referee requests a stoppage of time. 

 

Body

I tried to update all words relating to the timer in one proposal. I provided (what I think) are probably better examples of why the referee would stop the game under 14C.2.7 Referee Hand Signs.

 

 

References


Proposal 8: Proper playing of advantage rule.

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 07, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

The rulebook doesnt mention how to play advantages and whether or not a player should be penalised after advantage is played.

Proposal

Old Rule

14B.6 Penalties

In every instance of a violation of the rules the Referee must penalize the offending team, unless the Referee decides not to interrupt the game (advantage).

 

New Rule

14B.6 Penalties

In every instance of a violation of the rules the Referee must penalize the offending team or play the advantage. When playing the advantage the referee does not blow the whistle but should display the hand sign for a free shot and shout “Advantage!” In the event that an advantage was not gained, the referee should enforce the appropriate penalty from the initial point of infringement or, when the penalty has occurred within the goal area, the closest corner mark or 1 m in front of goal line. Additionally, at the referee’s discretion, offending players may be sent off after advantage has been played. The referee should not enforce this penalty until the offending team gains possession of the ball and should resume the game with a face off at the point of possession changeWhen two or more players fall and/or it is unclear whether a foul occurred, the Referees can interrupt the game and restart it with a face-off.

Body

This covers the advantage rule and how to play it. It says if there is no advantage to play the appropriate penalty (6.5m, penalty goal, free shot) from the initial point of infringement unless it was within the goal area in which case it will be from the corner mark or 1m in front of goal line.

References


Proposal 26: Definition of X-Style 9A.1

Committee: X-Style

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 16, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

11 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

Current definition was not descriptive.

Proposal

Old:
9A.1 Definition
In X-Style, starting groups of ten or fewer riders compete against each other, and the three best riders advance to the next round. Competitors only care about skills. Riders are given a 1 or 2 minute run to show off their best skills. In the final round, the three best riders become the winners of the competition. Judges will be selected from other starting groups or from non-competing volunteers.

 

New:
9A.1 Definition
X-Style is an event for riders to show off their most difficult skills. Riders can show their own style with creativity and ingenuity. The competitors are judged solely on the skills that they complete. Performance and falls do not count like in other freestyle competitions.

In X-Style, starting groups of ten or fewer riders compete against each other, and the top three riders advance to the next round. Riders show off their best skills in an individual run that is between 1 and 2 minutes in length based on the round. Judges will be selected from other starting groups or from non-competing volunteers.

Body

This description explains the competition at a high level.

See Discussion #69

References


Proposal 2: 14B.8.1 General Considerations (vicinity of the ball)

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on November 13, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

8 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 8, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

"Only in the vicinity of the ball may a player touch an opponent’s stick with their stick to block them."

Currently vicinity is not clear, different interpretations exist.

Proposal

Old

14B.8.1 General Considerations

All players must take care not to endanger others. The game is non-contact: the opponents and their unicycles may not be touched. The players must take care not to hit an opponent with their stick, especially after a shot. Only in the vicinity of the ball may a player touch an opponent’s stick with their stick to block them. However, this contact may not be hard. It is illegal to turn the blade of the stick upside down in order to hook into an opponent’s stick. Raising the opponent’s stick is allowed in principle, if not done using exaggerated roughness. If the opponent’s stick is raised to a high stick (see section 14B.10.4), it is always considered exaggerated roughness. Intentional delay of the game is not permitted.

 

New

14B.8.1 General Considerations

 

All players must take care not to endanger others. The game is non-contact: the opponents and their unicycles may not be touched. The players must take care not to hit an opponent with their stick, especially after a shot. Only in the vicinity of the ball (defined as the ball within the radius of the outstretched arm length plus stick) may a player touch an opponent’s stick with their stick to block them. However, this contact may not be hard. It is illegal to turn the blade of the stick upside down in order to hook into an opponent’s stick. Raising the opponent’s stick is allowed in principle, if not done using exaggerated roughness. If the opponent’s stick is raised to a high stick (see section 14B.10.4), it is always considered exaggerated roughness. Intentional delay of the game is not permitted.

 

Body

This provides a definition of what vicinity of the ball is and reduces players hitting opposition sticks for reasons other than to get the ball

References


Proposal 4: 14B.7.5 Obstacle moved to fouls

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on November 13, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Some rules are in the wrong section and should come under fouls instead.

Proposal

Old

14B.7.5 Obstacle A player who is off the unicycle must not be an obstacle for opponents. The player is considered an obstacle if the player, the unicycle or stick is hit by the ball and also if an opponent cannot move around freely. The player should remount at the same spot, but if necessary move out of the way of play first.

 

New

14B.8.7 Obstacle A player who is off the unicycle must not be an obstacle for opponents. The player is considered an obstacle if the player, the unicycle or stick is hit by the ball and also if an opponent cannot move around freely. The player should remount at the same spot, but if necessary move out of the way of play first.

Body

Move to fouls so clear understanding of what should be done when rule is not followed.

 

Pros: Clear ruling

Cons: None

References


Proposal 3: 14B.7.9 Moving The Goal

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on November 13, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Rule

14B.7.9 Moving The Goal

The players are not allowed to move the goal.

Proposal

Old Rule

14B.7.9 Moving The Goal

The players are not allowed to move the goal.

 

New Rule

14B.8.6 Moving The Goal

The players are not allowed to move the goal.

Body

Move this rule under fouls meaning that it is clear that it should therefore be penalised or advantage played.

 

Pros: Clear outcome when it occurs

Cons: None

 

References


Proposal 9: Enforcing Penalties - Time

Committee: Hockey

Vote Summary:

Passed on December 07, 2018

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

This gives instruction on whether a send off is inclusive of time stopage ( or halftime)

Proposal

Old

14B.6.5 Penalty Box

The Referee can send a player off the field for two minutes, five minutes or for the remainder of the game. This is done in the case of unsporting behavior and also for intentional or dangerous disregard of the rules. While a player is in the penalty box, the team may not substitute a replacement for that player. The referees should consider the following guidelines when punishing a player:

 

New

14B.6.5 Penalty Box

14B.6.5 Penalty Box The Referee can send a player off the field for two minutes, five minutes or for the remainder of the game. When a player is sent off for the remainder of the game they may not take part in the current match or their teams following match. However, after a five minute period the penalised team may bring a player on. These penalties are given in the case of unsporting behavior and also for intentional or dangerous disregard of the rules. While a player is in the penalty box, the team may not substitute a replacement for that player.

The referees should consider the following guidelines when punishing a player. The timer should be stopped while referees discuss the appropriate punishment and explain their ruling to players:

 

Old

14C.2.3 The Secretary

The Secretary sits at the desk and takes care that the scoreboard always shows the current score. After a goal the Secretary seeks eye contact with the First Referee to check if the goal is declared valid or not. After the end of the game the Secretary writes the final score into the report.

New

14C.2.3 The Secretary

The Secretary sits at the desk and takes care that the scoreboard always shows the current score. After a goal the Secretary seeks eye contact with the First Referee to check if the goal is declared valid or not. After the end of the game the Secretary writes the final score into the report. When a player has been sent-off for the remainder of the match, the secretary records the name of the player on both the completed match and the team’s next match and should inform the hockey director that the player must miss the teams next match.

 

Old

14C.2.4 The Timer

The Timer checks the time of play with a stopwatch and/or with a score board. The time is started whenever the Referee starts the game by blowing the whistle. Each period is ended by the sound of the score board (e.g. horn, bell, gong) or the blowing of a whistle by the timer. The Timer also stops the time whenever the Referee requests a time out.

New

14C.2.4 The Timer

The Timer checks the time of play with a stopwatch and/or with a score board. The time is started whenever the Referee starts the game by blowing the whistle. Each period is ended by the sound of the score board (e.g. horn, bell, gong) or the blowing of a whistle by the timer. The Timer also stops the time whenever the Referee requests a time out. In the case of a send-off, the timer records the time of send-off and the time the offender or substitute player will be allowed back on to the field.

 

Body

Based on Herberts recommendations I think this is what needs to be changed.

References


Proposal 47: Update Standard Skill Officials to not refer to Artistic officials

Committee: Freestyle

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 03, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

12 out of 12 voting members have voted.

Agree: 12, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Remove text that was clearly copied from the Artistic Freestyle Chapter during reorganization.

Proposal

Old rule:

8C.1 Standard Skill Officials

Artistic Director: The head organizer and administrator of artistic events. The Artistic Director’s job starts well before the convention, arranging equipment for the gyms (or performing areas) and recruiting the other artistic officials. With the Convention Host, the Artistic Director determines the operating systems, paperwork and methods to be used to run the events. With the Chief Judge, the Artistic Director is in charge of keeping events running on schedule, and answers all questions not pertaining to rules and judging. The Artistic Director is the highest authority on everything to do with the artistic events, except for decisions on rules and results.

Chief Judge: Like the Referee, the Chief Judge should be a thoroughly experienced person who must above all be objective and favor neither local, nor outside riders. The Chief Judge must be thoroughly familiar with all of the artistic officials’ jobs and all aspects of artistic rules. The Chief Judge oversees everything, deals with protests, and answers all rules and judging questions. The Chief Judge is responsible for seeing that all artistic officials are trained and ready, and that the artistic riding areas are correctly measured and marked on the floor. The Chief Judge is also responsible for the accuracy of all judging point tabulations and calculations.

8C.2 Training Officials

As the rules state, competitions cannot be started until all key artistic officials have been trained and understand their tasks. For Artistic events, the Chief Judge is in charge. For certain artistic events, a minimum level of judging experience is required. See section 7C.4.

New Rule:

8C.1 Standard Skill Officials

The host must designate the following officials for Standard Skill:

• Standard Skill Director

• Chief Judge

8C.2 Training Officials

Remove section.

Body

Simple is good.

References


Proposal 49: Relay (Track) - moving the Relay rules from 3 Track: Other to 2 Track: Racing

Committee: Track

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 02, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

For the relays the same rules apply as for the other Track Racing disciplines regarding the start, the use of lanes and the finishing. Therefore it would make more sense to put the rules for the relays in chapter 2 Track: Racing, because here you can find also all the other rules being used.

Proposal

Old Rule:

2A.1 Definition

Track racing covers events done on an athletic track. These rules apply to the following standard races: 800m, 400m, 100m, One-Foot, Wheel Walk, and IUF Slalom. Additional “Track and Field” events can be found in Track: Other Chapter.

 

3B.6.1 Relay (Track)

Usually 4 x 100m or 4 x 400m like in athletics.
The takeover zones are 20 meters long and must be marked on the track. Riders may remount if necessary, and must pick up the baton if it is dropped. The handover of the baton must be within the takeover zone. This means that before the baton crosses the start mark of the takeover zone only the incoming rider is in touch with the baton and at the end of the takeover zone only the outgoing rider is in touch with the baton. Riders may not throw the baton to make a pass and may not touch the ground with any part of their body while making a pass. If the baton is not handed over within the marked takeover zone, the team will be disqualified. Leaving of the lane within the takeover zone or when remounting does not result in disqualification as long as the riders do not obstruct, impede or interfere with another rider’s progress. There is no defined preparation area for the next riders as long as they stay within their lanes.
Mixed male/female teams may be used, and reasonable age groups may be used depend- ing on the number of expected competitors of the event. Each relay team may have any mix of ages, the age of the oldest rider determines the age group.

 


New Rule:

 

2A.1 Definition

Track racing covers events done on an athletic track. These rules apply to the following standard races: 800m, 400m, 100m, One-Foot, Wheel Walk, Relay and IUF Slalom. Additional “Track and Field” events can be found in Track: Other Chapter.

2B.6.6 Relay (Track)

Usually 4 x 100m or 4 x 400m like in athletics.
The takeover zones are 20 meters long and must be marked on the track. Riders may remount if necessary, and must pick up the baton if it is dropped. The handover of the baton must be within the takeover zone. This means that before the baton crosses the start mark of the takeover zone only the incoming rider is in touch with the baton and at the end of the takeover zone only the outgoing rider is in touch with the baton. Riders may not throw the baton to make a pass and may not touch the ground with any part of their body while making a pass. If the baton is not handed over within the marked takeover zone, the team will be disqualified. Leaving of the lane within the takeover zone or when remounting does not result in disqualification as long as the riders do not obstruct, impede or interfere with another rider’s progress. There is no defined preparation area for the next riders as long as they stay within their lanes.
Mixed male/female teams may be used, and reasonable age groups may be used depend- ing on the number of expected competitors of the event. Each relay team may have any mix of ages, the age of the oldest rider determines the age group.

Body

The current rule should only be moved from Chapter 3 to Chapter 2, so there are no changes to the current rule text.

References


Proposal 38: Fixed distance and free distance races

Committee: Road

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 08, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

17 out of 18 voting members have voted.

Agree: 17, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

We are currently incentivised to provide only fixed distance events, which takes a lot of effort from organisers and does not provide riders with variety. 

Fixed distance races are only worth organising if they can be comparable between different events (eg for personal bests). For that to be the case, they have to be flat and fast- there will be no hills, no cobblestones, minimal elevation change in the start/finish area etc. They are a lot of work in terms of measurement, and it limits the organiser's ability to place a start/finish area.

I think we need to give guidance to race organisers about what should be offered at Unicon or major regional championship event, which in my view should include at least one fixed distance race (eg 10km), and one non-fixed distance road race. 

I propose that we do this in 4A.1 and 4D.15

Proposal

Current

4A.1 Definition

Road races are longer distance races held on paved roads or paved bike paths. These rules specifically apply to 100k, Marathon, and 10k races, but may also be applied to other road races, such as a Time Trial or a Criterium

Proposed

4A.1 Definition

Road races are long distance races held on paved roads or paved bicycle paths.  This definition includes both fixed-distance and free-distance races, and different formats such as mass start races, time-trials and criterium

_______________________________________________________________________________

Proposed

*Add the section below as 4D.15.1; and move the current 4D.15.1 and 4D.15.2 down one section (ie 4D.15.1 becomes 4D.15.2; and 4D.15.2 becomes 4D.15.3)*

4D.15.1 Fixed distance and free distance distance races

The recognised fixed distance races are the 10km, Marathon(42.195km) and 100km.

A free distance race can be any race distance that is greater or less than 3% of the distance of a recognised fixed distance race.

It is expected that Unicon will have at least two road events, of which at least one is a recognized fixed distance event

4D.15.2 Distance measurement for fixed distance races (previously 4D.15.1)

In the case of fixed distance races, the course must be accurately measured along the shortest possible path. 

(*replace first sentence. Rest of the text remains the same*)

4D.15.3 Distance measurement for free distance races(previously 4D.15.2)

In the case where a free distance is used, the course must be measured with an accuracy of plus or minus 3% or better. Example: if a race is advertised as 80 km, the actual distance must be between 77.6km and 82.4km.

(*replace first sentence and the example distance. Rest of the text remains the same*)

------------------

All references in the rulebook to 'traditional distance' will be replaced with 'fixed distance race'. The references to 'other distances' or 'non-traditional race distances' will be replaced with 'free distance'

Body

As discussed in the corresponding thread

References


Proposal 25: 9B.5.5 Run Length

Committee: X-Style

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 11, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

11 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

A proposal to change and simplify the wording of rule 9B.5.5 in order to clarify an official format.

Proposal

Old Rule (9B.5.5 Run Length)

This is the recommended format: The length of a competitor’s run is determined by the round. • If three or more rounds: 1st round: 1 minute Intermediate rounds: 1 minute 30 seconds Finals: 2 minutes. • If two rounds: 1st round: 1 minute 30 seconds Finals: 2 minutes • If one round: 2 minutes

 

New Rule (9B.5.5 Run Length)

The length of a competitor's run is determined by the round:

- Final Round: 2 minutes
- Semi-final round: 1 min 30 seconds
- Previous rounds: 1 minute

If fewer there are three rounds, use only the run lengths that are relevant.

Example: If there is one round, it is considered the final round, and would be 2 minutes in length.

In smaller competitors, the director may alter the run lengths due to time constraints.

 

Body

The new rule removes "This is the recommended format", simplifies the description of run lengths, adds an example to clarify round lengths, and indicates that the director may alter run lengths due to time constraints.

References


Proposal 29: Add definition of Tire Contact Point in 1D.1

Committee: Main Committee

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 17, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

19 out of 23 voting members have voted.

Agree: 19, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

This is to add a definition of "Tire contact point", a term that is used in some rules in Track: Racing and Track: Other, to clear up what we mean by it.

Proposal

(There is no old rule, c.q. old definition)

New rule, to be added in 1D.1 in the correct alphabetic location:

Tire Contact Point: The centre of the contact patch between the tire and the riding surface. Usually judged by eye.

Body

In several Track rules, reference is made to the tire contact point. In a current discussion someone remarked that there is no such thing as a single contact point. There is a contact patch with finite dimensions. Hence, it is not clear if said "contact point" refers to the front of the contact patch, or maybe the centre or the rear of it. Also, the contact patch, while roughly being oval, is not a precisely defined shape. If you would look closely, you would see "islands" of contact outside a main contact area (and also "lakes" within the "mainland"), due to irregularities in the tire and the riding surface.

It was argued that the centre of the axle is more precisely defined. However, the centre of the axle is not necessarily located vertically above the tire contact point (e.g. if the unicycle is twisted sideways to any degree AND leaning sideways). This means that the two definitions are not always the same. Moreover, the centre of the axle crossing a line (for example the finish in Slow racing) is not easy to see because you have to imagine a vertical line. Therefore, in practice, judges will judge the passing of the contact point/patch anyway.

We can continue to use "tire contact point" anywhere in the rules, if we add a definition in 1D.1.

References


Proposal 6: 11B.5 Competitor rules - Results

Committee: Street

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 29, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

9 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 9, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

Small fixes.

Proposal

OLD:

11B.5 Results
Final results will be continuously announced and/or posted for public view. Results sheets will be posted after each category of an event. The protest period begins at this point.

 

NEW:

11B.5 Results
Preliminary results will be posted once the calculation of the points is done. Results sheets will be posted after each category of an event. The protest periods begins at this point. Finals results may be held off until the award ceremony if it is on the same day.

Body

That was a copy paste of flat. In street we don't announce continuously like in battles.

References


Proposal 51: 800m & 400m - moving the start variants from 2B.6.9 to 2B.6.2 & 2B.6.3

Committee: Track

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 02, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 10 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

The current description of the 800m race under "2B.6.3 800m" contains only one of the two possible start variants, and is therefore not correct if a waterfall start is used. This second start variant can be found under rule "2B.6.9 Lane Use", which is not very logical. The description of the start variants/start line-ups should therefore be moved from rule 2B.6.9 to the description of the discipline. In order to be completely consistent, the sentence for the start line-up at the 400m race should also be moved to the description of the discipline.

Proposal

Old Rule:

 

2B.6.2 400m Race

In the 400m race, riders must stay in their lane, and a dismount results in disqualification.

 

2B.6.3 800m Race

In the 800m race, riders start in a lane, but at some point (usually the first turn) non-lane racing rules apply. Dismounts are allowed.

 

2B.6.9 Lane Use

 

In most races, a rider must stay in his or her own lane, except when the rider has to swerve to avoid being involved in a crash. In all other cases, a rider who goes outside their lane is disqualified. Going outside a track lane means that the tire of the unicycle touches the ground outside his assigned lane. Riding on the marking is allowed. No physical contact between riders is allowed during racing. The 400m race is started with a stagger start. The 800m race may be started in one of two ways:
• Waterfall Start: This is a curved starting line that places all riders an equal distance from the first turn. If a waterfall start is used, non-lane rules apply (see below).
• Stagger Start: Riders are started in separate lanes, at separate locations. They must stay in their lanes for a specified distance before they may ‘cut in’ to the inside lanes. Lane rules apply only up to this point.

 

New Rule:

2B.6.2 400m Race

The 400m race is started with a stagger start, where riders are started in separate lanes, at separate locations. In the 400m race, riders must stay in their lane, and a dismount results in disqualification.

 

2B.6.3 800m Race

There are two different ways to run an 800m race, remounting after a dismount is allowed in both ways:

1. 800m Race with Stagger Start: Riders are started in separate lanes, at separate locations. (They must stay in their lanes for a specified distance before they may ‘cut in’ to the inside lanes. Lane rules apply only up to this point.) [*See the other Proposal: The race shall be run in lanes as far as the nearer edge of the breakline where riders may leave their respective lanes. The breakline shall be an arced line marked after the first bend across all lanes other than lane 1. To assist athletes identify the breakline, halved tennis balls can be placed on the lane lines immediately before the intersection of the lines and the breakline.After the breakline, non-lane racing rules apply.*]

2. 800m with Waterfall Start: Riders are started at a curved starting line that places all riders an equal distance from the first turn. If a waterfall start is used, non-lane rules apply from the start.

 

2B.6.9 Lane Use

In most races, a rider must stay in his or her own lane, except when the rider has to swerve to avoid being involved in a crash. In all other cases, a rider who goes outside their lane is disqualified. Going outside a track lane means that the tire of the unicycle touches the ground outside his assigned lane. Riding on the marking is allowed. No physical contact between riders is allowed during racing.

Body

This proposal is only for moving the start variants from rule 2B.6.9 to the corresponding discipline descriptions. A second proposal should replace the text in the round brackets () by the text in the square brackets []. For the other porposal look at "800m - definition of the point from which the non-lane racing rules are applied (changing 2B.6.3)"

For more information and the the improvement of the proposal about moving the start variants please look and comment into discussion#83: "800m - moving the start variants from 2B.6.9 to 2B.6.3".

For more information and the the improvement of the other proposal please look and comment into discussion#80: "800m - definition of the point from which the non-lane racing rules are applied (changing 2B.6.3)".

References


Proposal 41: 1 B.6 Transgender Riders

Committee: Main Committee

Vote Summary:

Passed on June 11, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

21 out of 23 voting members have voted.

Agree: 11, Disagree: 5, Abstain: 5.

Background

There is some great discussion about this issue and if individuals who are transitioning are creating unfair competition. Mark suggested that we keep it simpler for this Rulebook committee.

Proposal

OLD: nothing

NEW: 1 B.6  Transgender Riders
The IUF is committed to providing an open and safe environment for people of all genders. A rider may register with the gender (male or female) with which the rider identifies most.

Body

See the long discussion!

References


Proposal 33: 4B.1 Water for races longer than 10k

Committee: Road

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 24, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

18 out of 18 voting members have voted.

Agree: 16, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 2.

Background

Riders should carry their own hydration on longer races, but this will be only a suggestion in the rulebook.

Adding a section to Event Organizer rules.

Proposal

4B.1

OLD:

 

Water and food are the responsibility of the rider.   Hosts may offer food and water stations at their discretion.

New:

 

Water and food are the responsibility of the rider. It is recommended riders carry their own water on races longer than 10k. Hosts may offer food and water stations at their discretion.

 

Add to 4D "Event Organizer Rules"

OLD: nothing

NEW: (section under or with 4D.1 "Venue"?):  Hosts are strongly recommended to provide water to riders along the course for races longer than 10k.

Body

See the discussion.

References


Proposal 43: 7C.5 Scoring - adding dismount score calculation

Committee: Freestyle

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 28, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

10 out of 12 voting members have voted.

Agree: 10, Disagree: 0, Abstain: 0.

Background

When the dismount score was made a separate judging score, the text in the rulebook was not updated to reflect the new calculation.

 

Proposal

Old Rule:

7C.5 Scoring

To tabulate the scores in Artistic Freestyle events, each judge’s scores in a category or age group are totaled and restated as a percentage of that judge’s total points for that category or age group, i.e. the judge’s relative preferences for each performer. Then the percentages from all of the judges are totaled together. This is done first in both Performance and Technical. Once a percentage total for each competitor has been calculated for both Performance and Technical, these percentages are combined together to see the final results.
 


New Rule:

7C.5 Scoring

To tabulate the scores in Artistic Freestyle events, each judge’s scores in a category or age group are totaled and restated as a percentage of that judge’s total points for that category or age group, i.e. the judge’s relative preferences for each performer. Then the percentages from all of the judges are totaled together averaged per rider. This is done first in both Performance, and Technical, and Dismount. Once a percentage total the percentage average value for each competitor has been calculated for both Performance and Technical, these three averaged percentages are combined added together according to their weighting to see the final results.

Body

These calculations have been used; this is the documentation.

References


Proposal 27: 9C.4 Judging (assigning same rank)

Committee: X-Style

Vote Summary:

Passed on May 14, 2019

Votes on this proposal:

13 out of 11 voting members have voted.

Agree: 12, Disagree: 1, Abstain: 0.

Background

Proposing to disallow giving two riders the